Computing in the 21st century

   IBM’s Sequoia has overtaken Fujitsu’s K Computer to be named the world’s fastest supercomputer.

The Sequoia, also known as the IBM BlueGene/Q system, is the first U.S. supercomputer since November 2009 to reach the top of the TOP500 list.

The supercomputer, which is installed at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, achieved an impressive 16.32 petaflop/s on the Linpack benchmark using 1,572,864 cores.

Sequoia is also one of the most energy efficient systems on the list, which was announced this week at the 2012 International Supercomputing Conference in Hamburg, Germany.

The TOP500 list is compiled by Hans Meuer of the University of Mannheim, Germany, Erich Strohmaier and Horst Simon of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Jack Dongarra of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

On the latest list, Fujitsu’s “K Computer” installed at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (AICS) in Kobe, Japan, is now the No. 2 system with 10.51 Pflop/s on the Linpack benchmark using 705,024 SPARC64 processing cores.

The K Computer held the No. 1 spot on the previous two lists.

The new Mira supercomputer, an IBM BlueGene/Q system at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, debuted at No. 3, with 8.15 petaflop/s on the Linpack benchmark using 786,432 cores.

The other U.S. system in the Top 10 is the upgraded Jaguar at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, which was the top U.S. system on the previous list and now clocks in at No. 6.

The newest list also marks a return of European systems in force.

The most powerful system in Europe and No.4 on the List is SuperMUC, an IBM iDataplex system installed at Leibniz Rechenzentrum in Germany.

Another German machine, the JuQUEEN BlueGene/Q at Forschungszentrum Juelich, is No. 8.

Italy makes its début in the Top 10 with an IBM BlueGene/Q system installed at CINECA, at No. 7 on the list with 1.72 Pflop/s performance.

In all, four of the top 10 supercomputers are IBM BlueGene/Q systems.

France occupies the No. 9 spot with a homegrown Bull supercomputer.

China, which briefly took the No. 1 and No.3 spots in November 2010, has two systems in the Top 10, with Tianhe-1Aat the National Supercomputing Center in Tianjin in No. 5 and Nebulae at the National Supercomputing Centre in Shenzhen No. 10.

Total performance of all the systems on the list has increased considerably since November 2011, reaching 123.4 Pflop/s.

The combined performance of the last list was 74.2 Pflop/s.

In all, 20 of the supercomputers on the newest list reached performance levels of 1 Pflop/s or more.

The No. 500 machine on the list notched a performance level of 60.8 teraflop/s, which was enough to reach No. 332 just seven months ago.

Published on June 20, 2012 at 6:07 am  Leave a Comment  

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